17 June 2009

If communication is so important...

If communication is so important, what are the standard ways we measure it?

I am reading and marking essays.  One of the great things about this process is reading perspectives on project management from informed outsiders.  It's really interesting hearing other people's take on my job.

Take this comment from an essay; "Project managers always say how important communication is.  But how is communication measured?"

Yes, you have a plan, and yes you track whether things are done on time and to budget. 

But how do you measure the effectiveness of your project communciations?  And how do you make sure the activities remain aligned to the project goals?

Photo by  woodleywonderworks CC @ Flickr.

4 comments:

  1. And along those lines, if communication is so important, why are we SO BAD at making powerpoint charts? I mean, most presentations I see should be filed under Epic Fail.

    We say communication is important, and somehow manage to overlook the fact that our presentations communicate far less / far worse than they should...

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  2. Communication is the appearance of leadership.
    More complex is the organization to manage, more important the capacity to deliver "actionable" messages.

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  3. Dan, Are you referring to my Kano deck from earlier this week?

    uh oh...

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  4. Hi Craig,

    you ask how do you measure the effectiveness of communication in your project team? Social, organisational and business network analysis techniques allow you to diagnose communication, as opposed to measure. Have a look at these links:

    http://www.durantlaw.info/Collaboration+Maps

    http://www.durantlaw.info/Organisational+Interface+Maps

    http://www.durantlaw.info/Social+Capital+Maps

    or more generally the work from my PhD at this link

    http://www.durantlaw.info/Visualisations

    I think this sort approach allows you to do exactly what you ask.

    Best Regards
    Graham

    ReplyDelete

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